Zone 6A Experiment with Temperates

Jonathan

Carnivore
So my mother in-law and father in-law have a bog just off of their back yard that they own and I have decided to do a little experiment. I want to dig a 4x4 ft hole about a foot or two deep and I will fill it with Peat. Once that is done I will plant some plants in it. I am going to try some Typical Decumbent D.Capillaris and maybe a VFT and some Sarrs, Water it and let them have at it this summer. I am going to see if they will survive the winter season next year as I heard that as long as the Rhizome is in the ground and it is deep the ground temp should stay around 0 Celsius keeping them alive for winter? I will be selecting a spot that very little water run in but find a place that has enough water to sustain these plants (Preferably a damp wet area). I will take pictures of the journey with this but I won't be doing this for awhile but this is my plan for this summer.

Does anyone here think they won't survive our frigide NS winters?

My Location: 6A Nova Scotia Canada
 
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Lloyd Gordon

Parasitic Plant Aficionado
Staff member
I think some perlite would be good to prevent compacting and promote aeration and flow.
It would be best to isolate your grow area from ground water unless your ground water is very low in mineral salts.
If your bog is ground level and you mulch with a thick coating of pine needles (over some coarse netting to make removal easier) + a foot or so of snow, survival should be good.
 

Jonathan

Carnivore
I think some perlite would be good to prevent compacting and promote aeration and flow.
It would be best to isolate your grow area from ground water unless your ground water is very low in mineral salts.
If your bog is ground level and you mulch with a thick coating of pine needles (over some coarse netting to make removal easier) + a foot or so of snow, survival should be good.
With all do respect, I am going to try with no mulch or perlite. The plan is if it is successful then I will just let the bog do it's own thing and create it's own Peat layer beneath of the bagged stuff I put ontop. The bog at the back of their house has natural Sphagnum and am pretty sure it's Peat underneath.
 

Jonathan

Carnivore
Purps and temperate dews should be good.
Pictures of the bog?
My Wife and I move there in May or April. I will get pics up once I get to the area. I plan to try some Trumpet Pitchers, and D.Capillaris (typical decumbent forms). If all goes well and they survive our winter I will try a VFT next year. :)
 
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Lloyd Gordon

Parasitic Plant Aficionado
Staff member
If you don't mind risking losing the plants, that's Ok.
Years ago, I had to leave my (potted) microbogs outside as I had no storage.
I covered them with big plastic garbage bins and left them outside in the shade (to avoid freeze/thaw cycles). Actually a good number of the trumpet Sarrs survived but a lot were lost. The temperate dews were fine.
A good snow cover will help a lot.
We're in 6a-b.
 

Sib

Carnivore
I feel like its not the temps that do them in. Like lloyd said the freeze thaw cycle is hard on them. Also here the winter winds are extreamly dessicating.
 

Jonathan

Carnivore
I feel like its not the temps that do them in. Like lloyd said the freeze thaw cycle is hard on them. Also here the winter winds are extreamly dessicating.
I'm going to try and find a decent spot with shade and light to avoid the freezing then unthawing issue that Lloyd pointed out.
 

Eric

Plant
Hmm, why would you put a bag of peat into a peat bog, Jonathan?
You may not succeed if the hydrology carries in minerals that some CPs don't tolerate. On the other hand side, if the bog offers very good conditions for CPs you may be too successful and the CPs you naturalise here may well spread into the wild. It could be really hard to get rid of them even if you'd desperately wanted it for whatever reason.
Maybe it is better to look at the potential of these boggy places on your relatives property and think of how you could help them to get to their full potential. You could do some natural gardening like weeding out unwanted species, supporting wanted species and increase natural diversity.
Nova Scotia has one of the best sets of CPs in Canada. It would be best to get hold of regional CP seed, I mean CPs that naturally live in your region (autochtonous species) like local Drosera or S.purpurea and grow those on the property rather than Drosera from the US, Dionaea or S.flava and so on.
 

Jonathan

Carnivore
Hmm, why would you put a bag of peat into a peat bog, Jonathan?
You may not succeed if the hydrology carries in minerals that some CPs don't tolerate. On the other hand side, if the bog offers very good conditions for CPs you may be too successful and the CPs you naturalise here may well spread into the wild. It could be really hard to get rid of them even if you'd desperately wanted it for whatever reason.
Maybe it is better to look at the potential of these boggy places on your relatives property and think of how you could help them to get to their full potential. You could do some natural gardening like weeding out unwanted species, supporting wanted species and increase natural diversity.
Nova Scotia has one of the best sets of CPs in Canada. It would be best to get hold of regional CP seed, I mean CPs that naturally live in your region (autochtonous species) like local Drosera or S.purpurea and grow those on the property rather than Drosera from the US, Dionaea or S.flava and so on.
The bog is rocky and I'm thinking the bag of Peat will help set the area. I do have to test the water first and see the TDS reading. As far as introducing these things is I will contain it with walls and like I said before it's on Private property and it's huge.
 

Hal

Plant
Staff member
If it's rocky, it's not a bog.
NS has a few hardy CP's but you'll be lucky to keep VFTs and some Sarrs going without heavy mulch.
 

Jonathan

Carnivore
If it's rocky, it's not a bog.
NS has a few hardy CP's but you'll be lucky to keep VFTs and some Sarrs going without heavy mulch.
There are some areas that have rock and some that don't. I will take a pic once I get there to show you.
 

Carson Hardy

Carnivore
I see some sphagnum, which means the moisture levels are atleast okay for the majority of the year.

Dessication could be an issue if there isnt snowmelt etc in the nearby hills to drain down and keep it watered
 
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