sarracenia storage

daniella3d

Carnivorous Plant Addict
One indication that the rhizome is bad is when pitcher are wilting. I don't mean drying up but becoming soft and wilting. I know if caught early some people are cutting off healthy (white) part of the rhizome and throw away any part of the rhizome that is brown inside. a healthy rhizome is rather white and firm inside.

I don't think you need vermiculite, peat and a bit of perlite is enough. I don't seen any advantage of using vermiculite. I would avoid diluting the peat too much with unnecessary stuff because peat has a good buffering capability for keeping the sarracenia at the right PH. If you mixt it with too much of other things, then you are removing a bit of this buffering and might end up with a soil that is less acidic. Plus vermiculite can contain iron, magnesium and aluminium, so maybe not the best thing to use with sensitive carnivorous plants. Perlite is a volcanic glass and probably more neutral. I would never use vermiculite in my sarracenia mix, I would not trust it.

Perlite will help the soil become less compacted and will provide more oxygen to the roots. Vermiculite will retain moisture and it's not needed with peat because peat already absorb more than enough moisture. So vermiculite is not needed at all. It won't help the soil be more aerated. It's useless I think, it could create a problem with rot. This is my opinion, and why I never use it. I have no experience with vermiculite.
 
Last edited:

Lloyd Gordon

Parasitic Plant Aficionado
Staff member
Pure peat would probably be ok but the additional perlite almost certainly helps. I use vermiculite for plants that need dryish, light soil. The only CP's I use it for are Pings.
 

Lloyd Gordon

Parasitic Plant Aficionado
Staff member
South Carolina has temperatures around 36-55°F (lows and highs) for 3 months in the winter. So you have to arrange that for your Sarr's. One way is to have them in ground with mulch and snow cover.
 
Top