Leaf Pullings

Muckydoo

Carnivore
So, I had moderate success in the past with Pinguicula pullings, just sticking them into soil.

I tried a new technique out and it seems to work great!
My strike rate is 80% on 'bottom" row leaves and 100% (so far) on younger leaves.

I get those clear condiment containers from the dollar store (2oz, 3.25oz and 4oz)

Put a bit of paper towel in the bottom, and cover with coarse sand.
I put a few drips of water in to wet the paper towel and place my pullings on top.

I poke 3-4 holes in the lid, and place on the cup.
I check every few days to make sure the paper towel is still wet (you can see though the bottom of the cup) and add water if needed.

Once they strike and get a few leaves, I stop drip watering and switch to misting them with water each day.
Not sure if misting matters, sometime they wouldn't drop roots, but after I did the dry/mist/dry/mist they popped a few out!
And long roots that are (usually) straight down.

I added #20 sand to the jaumavensis so I could keep track of those tiny guys!





 

Muckydoo

Carnivore
That is another method I tried, but I had moderate success with that one.

I like adding the sand as it creates a place for the roots to grow down, and helps create good anchor roots for when I transplant them.
Good healthy root system, means a happy healthy plant!

Here is my bigger container of moranensis.



And this is the roots of one of the sprouts.
It has an extra holding power due to that fuzzy root!
I'm going to have to pot these up soon!

 

Sparky

Sprout
So, I had moderate success in the past with Pinguicula pullings, just sticking them into soil.

I tried a new technique out and it seems to work great!
My strike rate is 80% on 'bottom" row leaves and 100% (so far) on younger leaves.

I get those clear condiment containers from the dollar store (2oz, 3.25oz and 4oz)

Put a bit of paper towel in the bottom, and cover with coarse sand.
I put a few drips of water in to wet the paper towel and place my pullings on top.

I poke 3-4 holes in the lid, and place on the cup.
I check every few days to make sure the paper towel is still wet (you can see though the bottom of the cup) and add water if needed.

Once they strike and get a few leaves, I stop drip watering and switch to misting them with water each day.
Not sure if misting matters, sometime they wouldn't drop roots, but after I did the dry/mist/dry/mist they popped a few out!
And long roots that are (usually) straight down.

I added #20 sand to the jaumavensis so I could keep track of those tiny guys!





Thanks I will definitely try this method. What varieties of pinguicula butterwort do you have?
 

Muckydoo

Carnivore
I lost count, but around 40 different types I do believe. Lost a few this winter, but easy to replace this spring.
 

Sparky

Sprout
Thats awesom! I just recently started with my first plant. In your collection do you have Pinguicula Gypsicola? This plant is such a beauty and it is so rare in Canada.
I would love to get this plant one day.
 

Muckydoo

Carnivore
I had one but it died this winter. I hear it can be a bit tricky to keep alive. Your best bet is a pinguicula gypsicola x moctezumae. Easy to find and it looks very similar... At least mine does lol.
 

H2O

Administrator
Staff member
I haven’t grown P. gypsicola but I’ve also heard that P. gypsicola x moctezumae is much easier. I grow it like the rest of my Pings and don’t give it any particular special treatment, it gets watered when the other do whether it is dormant or not.
 

Sparky

Sprout
I had one but it died this winter. I hear it can be a bit tricky to keep alive. Your best bet is a pinguicula gypsicola x moctezumae. Easy to find and it looks very similar... At least mine does lol.
Thanks, yes I will now go for Pinguicula gypsicola X moctezumae this spring.
Thank you again
 

jeff

Carnivorous Plant Addict
Bonjour

gypsicola is quite easy but you have to respect some parameters :

- the substrate which must be mineral limestone or gypsum-based, moreover in the name of this plant we find the concept of gypsum.
- dormant from October to May the substrate must be dry or very slightly moist, it is a plant which is particularly prone to decay
- from may to october when frosts and low temperature are no longer to be feared we can take them outside ,so they can eat

for me the hybrid gypsicola x moctezumae does not have leaves as spectacular as gypsicola, the latter have fairly fine leaves a bit like heterophylla or medusinae for that matter
 

Sparky

Sprout
Thanks for the info, it really helps. Somehow I am really fascinated by this plant and I would love to own one. When it is dormant from October to May does the plant require sunlight/ Artificial light? Also when we take them outside in summer time, does it require direct or indirect sunlight? Thanks
 
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