First purpurea dormancy question

TrEv

Seedling
I went to check on my small purpureas outside, since I now can have access to them after much snow had melted. They were covered to protect them from the weight of the snow.

Some of them, their leaves are all brown, does this mean that they are dead or would the roots still be fine?

thanks in advance
 

H2O

Administrator
Staff member
Hi TrEv!

Are you able to get a quick picture of it and post it here? If your phone takes pictures you can upload them directly from your phone.

Most of the time dead brown leaves on purpurea isn’t a good sign as they typically keep their leaves for over a year but I’ve seen seedlings come back from their roots before.
 

daniella3d

Carnivore
wow, those are so small they could have remained inside under 24/7 light for 2 years. They are a little small to be put outside. It's ok I guess for purpurea but they will grow much slower that way. Also be careful when you cover them because they must not dry. The snow would probably be better because it would water the plants when it is melting. I keep all my seedlings inside and they can skip dormancy for 2 years. That way you get a mature plant in 2 years instead of 4 or 5.

I am not sure they are still alive. They don't even seem to have a rhizome yet. How old are they?
 

TrEv

Seedling
wow, those are so small they could have remained inside under 24/7 light for 2 years. They are a little small to be put outside. It's ok I guess for purpurea but they will grow much slower that way. Also be careful when you cover them because they must not dry. The snow would probably be better because it would water the plants when it is melting. I keep all my seedlings inside and they can skip dormancy for 2 years. That way you get a mature plant in 2 years instead of 4 or 5.

I am not sure they are still alive. They don't even seem to have a rhizome yet. How old are they?
I had no room in my fridge due to other species that require a warmer dormancy than outside. So I took a chance, since they are a northern variety. :( I watered them all frequently around our last days before complete frost.

When I transplanted them the other day they had a root about 3 inches long and about a mm thick close to the base.
 

daniella3d

Carnivore
For seedlings, you can keep them inside, growing at full speed, at 25C, with lights on 24/7. They don't need any dormancy for the first year or two. No need to put them in the fridge at all. You only need a humidity dome of a small setup with a T5HO light, that's all. They grow so fast that way, much better. I think this is the best and safest way to grow sarracenia seedlings. I use this: https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B0748CHLMY/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o08_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

If you want to grow seedlings, it is best to keep them inside until they are large enough, and no dormancy until then. Unlike the adult sarracenias, the seedlings respond amazing to a little bit of fertilizer like the MaxSea diluted at 1/4 the normal strength as a foliar spray until they are large enough to receive it in the pitchers.
 
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daniella3d

Carnivore
I would rise the rhizome of the plants that are in the 2 last pictures because they may be buried a bit too deep. They grow better if light get on the rhizome and there is less risk of rot. Once I separated a division from the main plant and it broke short and did not have any roots. I planted it still and it grew all the roots and new pitchers at the same time. Sarracenias are amazing.
 

TrEv

Seedling
I would rise the rhizome of the plants that are in the 2 last pictures because they may be buried a bit too deep. They grow better if light get on the rhizome and there is less risk of rot. Once I separated a division from the main plant and it broke short and did not have any roots. I planted it still and it grew all the roots and new pitchers at the same time. Sarracenias are amazing.
Done :p thanks
 

H2O

Administrator
Staff member
Not to contradict but S. minor grows VERY deep compared to all the other species, when I repot they are always growing deeper and deeper, sometimes more then halfway down a 1 gallon pot. These are just seedlings but if they are pure S. minor I wouldn’t worry about it.
 

H2O

Administrator
Staff member
I’ve only been growing S. minor for 9-10 years so can only speak from that experience, I could very well be wrong, but mine have consistently grown well under the soil surface.

Either way I don’t think you need to worry about seedlings as they seem to be growing well.

Do you have a location for these ones?
 

TrEv

Seedling
I’ve only been growing S. minor for 9-10 years so can only speak from that experience, I could very well be wrong, but mine have consistently grown well under the soil surface.

Either way I don’t think you need to worry about seedlings as they seem to be growing well.

Do you have a location for these ones?
Not sure if you were asking me. But they are in my appartment under grow lights and indirect sunlight from the window.

If you are inquiring about the origin. I don't know I bought the mother plant at my garden store.
 
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H2O

Administrator
Staff member
Very cool that you found S. minor at a garden centre! Not one you see very often!

It’s also one that I’ve heard grows well under lights due to its short nature and shortened need for a dormancy. I visited a population just north of Okeechobee a couple years ago and although it was “cold” that day I was still in shorts a tshirt and apparently it never stays cool for more then a day.
 

daniella3d

Carnivore
I’ve only been growing S. minor for 9-10 years so can only speak from that experience, I could very well be wrong, but mine have consistently grown well under the soil surface.

Either way I don’t think you need to worry about seedlings as they seem to be growing well.

Do you have a location for these ones?
Cool, that's good to know. Mine are probably growing a bit less deep because I planted them that way to begin with.
 
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